Stellar

lovetheday:

beexgood:

I often romanticize about these types of train rides.

These are the type of train rides I write about.

pft. then don’t ride amtrak.

lovetheday:

beexgood:

I often romanticize about these types of train rides.

These are the type of train rides I write about.

pft. then don’t ride amtrak.

(Source: para-quedas, via bryanwere)

prostheticknowledge:

Binairy Talk

Installation by Niklas Ißelburg and Jakob Kilian uses controlled smoke to relay a binary message from one computer to another - video embedded below:

The interactive installation “Binairy Talk” uses smoke signs to transmit digital data. Air serves as the communication medium for binary code, as a carrier of data and information across a distance. The hidden processes of the digital world are transfered into the analog world whereby the apparent immateriality and infallibility of the computer language is overcome.

More Here

Energy-Efficient Industrial Loft With French Flair

designed-for-life:

imageimage Combing two styles can be a hit and miss but in this “New York loft living style” home in Portland, Oregon, the blend of raw industrial and the elegance of French chic have blended seamlessly to create a home jam pack full of character and class. On top of looking great it is a net zero-energy loft meaning it generates the energy it consumes — making the world better one beautiful home at a time. image Enjoy the virtual tour!

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I’m angry that I live in a world where a man who picks food for a living can’t afford to feed his family.

—Cesar Chavez (x)

(Source: odinsblog, via sociolab)

spaceplasma:

One Special Day in the Life of Planet Earth

The cameras on NASA’s Cassini spacecraft captured this rare look at Earth and its moon from Saturn orbit on July 19, 2013. Taken while performing a large wide-angle mosaic of the entire Saturn ring system, narrow-angle camera images were deliberately inserted into the sequence in order to image Earth and its moon. This is the second time that Cassini has imaged Earth from within Saturn’s shadow, and only the third time ever that our planet has been imaged from the outer solar system.

Earth is the blue point of light on the left; the moon is fainter, white, and on the right. Both are seen here through the faint, diffuse E ring of Saturn. Earth was brighter than the estimated brightness used to calculate the narrow-angle camera exposure times. Hence, information derived from the wide-angle camera images was used to process this color composite.

Both Earth and the moon have been increased in brightness for easy visibility; in addition, brightness of the Moon has been increased relative to the Earth, and the brightness of the E ring has been increased as well.

The first image of Earth captured from the outer solar system was taken by NASA’s Voyager 1 in 1990 and famously titled “Pale Blue Dot”. Sixteen years later, in 2006, Cassini imaged the Earth in the stunning and unique mosaic of Saturn called “In Saturn’s Shadow-The Pale Blue Dot”. And, seven years further along, Cassini did it again in a coordinated event that became the first time that Earth’s inhabitants knew in advance that they were being imaged from nearly a billion miles (nearly 1.5 billion kilometers) away. It was the also the first time that Cassini’s highest-resolution camera was employed so that Earth and its moon could be captured as two distinct targets.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SSI

astronomicalwonders:

The Trifid Nebula - M20
The massive star factory known as the Trifid Nebula was captured in all its glory with the Wide-Field Imager camera attached to the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO’s La Silla Observatory in northern Chile. The nebula is named after the dark dust bands that trisect its glowing heart, the Trifid Nebula is a rare combination of three nebulae types that reveal the fury of freshly formed stars and point to more star birth in the future.
Credit: ESO/MPG

astronomicalwonders:

The Trifid Nebula - M20

The massive star factory known as the Trifid Nebula was captured in all its glory with the Wide-Field Imager camera attached to the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO’s La Silla Observatory in northern Chile. The nebula is named after the dark dust bands that trisect its glowing heart, the Trifid Nebula is a rare combination of three nebulae types that reveal the fury of freshly formed stars and point to more star birth in the future.

Credit: ESO/MPG

voyeurhour:

erasure of Asian people and characters is very deep rooted in American media and goes all the way back to conception—don’t let it persist!

(Source: shoorm, via fandomsandfeminism)

brucesterling:

designculturemind:

Tangible Media

MIT’s Tangible Media is coming along nicely,

"Almost like a table of living clay, the inFORM is a surface that three-dimensionally changes shape, allowing users to not only interact with digital content in meatspace, but even hold hands with a person hundreds of miles away. And that’s only the beginning."

*The tie-in with the projection-mapping is especially good.

(via emergentfutures)