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from89:

The beauty of science and art are embodied in what’s known as the astronomical compendium, a multipurpose, all-in-one instrument that carries numerous devices for telling the time and performing astronomical calculations. Many astronomical compendia, such as the ones housed at the Museo Galileo in Florence, Italy, were constructed in German lands in the 16th and 17th centuries. 

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laurendestefano:

bahahahahahahaha

(Source: sandandglass, via thegeek531)

jupiter2:

What Your Body Looks Like Top To Bottom

jupiter2:

What Your Body Looks Like Top To Bottom

(via asapscience)

food52:

Wake up to freshly baked bread.

Seeded Whole Grain Breakfast Bread on Half-Baked Harvest

(Source: sandandglass, via upworthy)

galaxyclusters:

eatsleepdraw:

Chris Hadfield 
by Cindy Bolívar
lntergalactico.tumblr.com

A

galaxyclusters:

eatsleepdraw:

Chris Hadfield 

by Cindy Bolívar

lntergalactico.tumblr.com

A

(via space-tart)

watershedplus:

On rare years when the conditions are right in the arid landscape of the Badlands, in the American West, wildflowers burst into a display of colour for just a few days.
The vegetation in the region has adapted to the climate, with just a small amount of moisture the desert can become coloured with sweeping fields of Scorpion Weed, Beeplant and the flowers of the Pincushion Cacti. These blooms can be very short-lived to conserve moisture.

Photographs by Guy Tal

From here

(via brilliantbotany)

bijoux-et-mineraux:

Vanadinite - ACF mine, Mibladen, Morocco

(Source: spiriferminerals.com, via mineralia)

mountstar:

Types of Matter

(via sagansense)

thedemon-hauntedworld:

Hubble/Subaru composite of star-forming region S 106
This image shows Sh 2-106, or S106 for short. This is a compact star forming region in the constellation Cygnus (The Swan). A newly-formed star called S106 IR is shrouded in dust at the centre of the image, and is responsible for the surrounding gas cloud’s hourglass-like shape and the turbulence visible within. Light from glowing hydrogen is coloured blue in this image.
The image combines observations from the Hubble Space Telescope (in the centre) with images from the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan’s Subaru Telescope to extend the field of view around the edges of the image.
Credit: NASA, ESA, the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) and NAOJ

thedemon-hauntedworld:

Hubble/Subaru composite of star-forming region S 106

This image shows Sh 2-106, or S106 for short. This is a compact star forming region in the constellation Cygnus (The Swan). A newly-formed star called S106 IR is shrouded in dust at the centre of the image, and is responsible for the surrounding gas cloud’s hourglass-like shape and the turbulence visible within. Light from glowing hydrogen is coloured blue in this image.

The image combines observations from the Hubble Space Telescope (in the centre) with images from the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan’s Subaru Telescope to extend the field of view around the edges of the image.

Credit: NASA, ESA, the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) and NAOJ

skunkbear:

3D Fractals

Last week I met Tom Beddard, a physicist turned web developer turned artist (and friendly guy). He creates fractals — those recursive shapes that infinitely repeat at every scale. They’re based on simple math, but they can create some amazing images.

Says Beddard: “I don’t seek any new mathematical insight into the resulting structures, it’s a purely aesthetic pursuit to scratch a creative itch. Part of the fascination with fractal exploration is when … amazing and completely unexpected structures can pop out and surprise you.”

Some of the fractals look like Gothic architecture. Some of them look like alien seed pods. All of them are mesmerizing. You can see lots more on Beddard’s flickr page. You can actually fly through the fractals and see them morphing in these videos. And now, thanks to a new app called Frax that Beddard helped develop, you can make fractals of your very own.

(via cosmo-nautic)