Stellar

ourpresidents:

Ike Signs the NASA Act - Today in History

On July 29, 1958, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 establishing the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).  Woot!

Images: 

The National Aeronautics and Space act of 1958. 

President Eisenhower Presents NASA Commissions to Dr. T. Keith Glennan as the first administrator for NASA and Dr. Hugh L. Dryden as deputy administrator. Courtesty of NASA.

Statement by the President regarding H.R. 12575, the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958, July 29, 1958.

Explore the Early History and Development of NASA from the Eisenhower Library

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

distant-traveller:

Observing alert – Delta Aquarid meteor shower peaks this week

Watch for the southern Delta Aquarid meteor shower to peak over the next two mornings July 29-30. The best time for viewing for northern observers will be the hour before the start of dawn.

Image credit: John Chumack

distant-traveller:

Observing alert – Delta Aquarid meteor shower peaks this week

Watch for the southern Delta Aquarid meteor shower to peak over the next two mornings July 29-30. The best time for viewing for northern observers will be the hour before the start of dawn.

Image credit: John Chumack

(Source: universetoday.com, via galaxyclusters)

astronomicalwonders:

An Infrared view of the Orion Nebula
"This wide-field view of the Orion Nebula (Messier 42), lying about 1350 light-years from Earth, was taken with the VISTA infrared survey telescope at ESO’s Paranal Observatory in Chile.The new telescope’s huge field of view allows the whole nebula and its surroundings to be imaged in a single picture and its infrared vision also means that it can peer deep into the normally hidden dusty regions and reveal the curious antics of the very active young stars buried there."
Credit: VISTA/ESO

astronomicalwonders:

An Infrared view of the Orion Nebula

"This wide-field view of the Orion Nebula (Messier 42), lying about 1350 light-years from Earth, was taken with the VISTA infrared survey telescope at ESO’s Paranal Observatory in Chile.The new telescope’s huge field of view allows the whole nebula and its surroundings to be imaged in a single picture and its infrared vision also means that it can peer deep into the normally hidden dusty regions and reveal the curious antics of the very active young stars buried there."

Credit: VISTA/ESO

mathhombre:

spring-of-mathematics:

Type of Spirals: A spiral is a curve in the plane or in the space, which runs around a centre in a special way.
Different spirals follow. Most of them are produced by formulas:The radius r(t) and the angle t are proportional for the simplest spiral, the spiral of Archimedes. Therefore the equation is:
(3) Polar equation: r(t) = at [a is constant].
From this follows
(2) Parameter form:  x(t) = at cos(t), y(t) = at sin(t),
(1) Central equation:  x²+y² = a²[arc tan (y/x)]².

You can make a  spiral by two motions of a point: There is a uniform motion in a fixed direction and a motion in a circle with constant speed. Both motions start at the same point. 
(1) The uniform motion on the left moves a point to the right. - There are nine snapshots.
(2) The motion with a constant angular velocity moves the point on a spiral at the same time. - There is a point every 8th turn.
(3) A spiral as a curve comes, if you draw the point at every turn(Image).

Figure 1: (1) Archimedean spiral - (2) Equiangular Spiral (Logarithmic Spiral, Bernoulli’s Spiral).
Figure 2 : (1) Clothoide (Cornu Spiral) - (2) Golden spiral (Fibonacci number).

More Spirals: If you replace the term r(t)=at of the Archimedean spiral by other terms, you get a number of new spirals. There are six spirals, which you can describe with the functions f(x)=x^a [a=2,1/2,-1/2,-1] and  f(x)=exp(x), f(x)=ln(x). You distinguish two groups depending on how the parameter t grows from 0.

Figure 4:  If the absolute modulus of a function r(t) is increasing, the spirals run from inside to outside and go above all limits. The spiral 1 is called parabolic spiral or Fermat’s spiral.
Figure 5: If the absolute modulus of a function r(t) is decreasing, the spirals run from outside to inside. They generally run to the centre, but they don’t reach it. There is a pole.  Spiral 2 is called the Lituus (crooked staff).

Figure 7: Spirals Made of Line Segments.

Source:  Spirals by Jürgen Köller.

See more on Wikipedia:  SpiralArchimedean spiralCornu spiralFermat’s spiralHyperbolic spiralLituus, Logarithmic spiral
Fibonacci spiral, Golden spiral, Rhumb line, Ulam spiral
Hermann Heights Monument, Hermannsdenkmal.

Image: I shared at Spirals by Jürgen Köller - Ferns by Margaret Oomen & Ferns by Rocky.

Spiral compulsion. But this is a handy reference.

(via mathlover1530)

designed-for-life:

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I came across this lovely DIY by Abeautifulmess and couldn’t resist sharing with you all.

Created by printing a image of a moon onto transparency film sheet and projecting onto her desired wall, the girls over at Abeautifulmess were able to determine scale and proportion as well as the design of the moon. After outlining the area with gold craft paint and filling the solid space VOILA and great wall decal design where the options are infinite!

jtotheizzoe:

griseus:

The spotted handfish (Brachionichthys hirsutus), an amazing creature that walks the ocean floor, is a rare Australian fish from the family Brachionichthyidae. It is classified as Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List 2002. is the first Australian marine species to be threatened with extinction.

The greatest threats to the handfish appear to be siltation and invasive species. The Derwent Estuary where the fish lives is highly urbanised and industrialised, and a range of marine pests have been introduced through shipping.  One key pest is the Northern Pacific Seastar (Asterias amurensis), a particularly large and voracious predator that is now abundant in the estuary. Studies by CSIRO show that the seastars eat the stalked ascidians that the handfish use to attach their eggs.

Like I always say, a fish with a hand is better than two in the bush

designed-for-life:

image

An expensive, ornate vase can be as much of a centrepiece as the flowers that are in it. These floating vases designed by the Japanese group oodesign take things in the opposite direction by making them look like water ripples.

Shaped like ripples in water, the floating vases by Oodesign
 from japan allow users to place flowers into a PET formed resin void – floating nonchalantly on the water. fill your favorite container or transparent bowl or a glass with water and float the vase according to the movement of the air, the plants change their position within the container.

Purchase here

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