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galaxyclusters:

eatsleepdraw:

Chris Hadfield 
by Cindy Bolívar
lntergalactico.tumblr.com

A

galaxyclusters:

eatsleepdraw:

Chris Hadfield 

by Cindy Bolívar

lntergalactico.tumblr.com

A

(via space-tart)

watershedplus:

On rare years when the conditions are right in the arid landscape of the Badlands, in the American West, wildflowers burst into a display of colour for just a few days.
The vegetation in the region has adapted to the climate, with just a small amount of moisture the desert can become coloured with sweeping fields of Scorpion Weed, Beeplant and the flowers of the Pincushion Cacti. These blooms can be very short-lived to conserve moisture.

Photographs by Guy Tal

From here

(via brilliantbotany)

bijoux-et-mineraux:

Vanadinite - ACF mine, Mibladen, Morocco

(Source: spiriferminerals.com, via mineralia)

mountstar:

Types of Matter

(via sagansense)

thedemon-hauntedworld:

Hubble/Subaru composite of star-forming region S 106
This image shows Sh 2-106, or S106 for short. This is a compact star forming region in the constellation Cygnus (The Swan). A newly-formed star called S106 IR is shrouded in dust at the centre of the image, and is responsible for the surrounding gas cloud’s hourglass-like shape and the turbulence visible within. Light from glowing hydrogen is coloured blue in this image.
The image combines observations from the Hubble Space Telescope (in the centre) with images from the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan’s Subaru Telescope to extend the field of view around the edges of the image.
Credit: NASA, ESA, the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) and NAOJ

thedemon-hauntedworld:

Hubble/Subaru composite of star-forming region S 106

This image shows Sh 2-106, or S106 for short. This is a compact star forming region in the constellation Cygnus (The Swan). A newly-formed star called S106 IR is shrouded in dust at the centre of the image, and is responsible for the surrounding gas cloud’s hourglass-like shape and the turbulence visible within. Light from glowing hydrogen is coloured blue in this image.

The image combines observations from the Hubble Space Telescope (in the centre) with images from the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan’s Subaru Telescope to extend the field of view around the edges of the image.

Credit: NASA, ESA, the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) and NAOJ

skunkbear:

3D Fractals

Last week I met Tom Beddard, a physicist turned web developer turned artist (and friendly guy). He creates fractals — those recursive shapes that infinitely repeat at every scale. They’re based on simple math, but they can create some amazing images.

Says Beddard: “I don’t seek any new mathematical insight into the resulting structures, it’s a purely aesthetic pursuit to scratch a creative itch. Part of the fascination with fractal exploration is when … amazing and completely unexpected structures can pop out and surprise you.”

Some of the fractals look like Gothic architecture. Some of them look like alien seed pods. All of them are mesmerizing. You can see lots more on Beddard’s flickr page. You can actually fly through the fractals and see them morphing in these videos. And now, thanks to a new app called Frax that Beddard helped develop, you can make fractals of your very own.

(via cosmo-nautic)

oxidoreductase:

scigrrrl:

brainsx:

hey guys, check out these kick-ass lab shoes I bought myself! they come in red and gray.

WANT THESE! LOVE IT!

Toms are the most comfortable shoes ever and now they come in even more shades of AWESOME.

(via galaxyclusters)

nivueniconnue:

too amazing

(Source: vraieronique, via i---ickk)

geometrymatters:

The geometry of DNA: a structural revision

This proposed structure for DNA is wholly founded upon mathematical
principles. Although the geometrical modification to the base pairings is
relatively minor, the resulting double helix manifests a clarity altogether
distinct from that offered by Crick and Watson and it would appear to
shed light upon a number of areas of continuing uncertainty.

• Geometric equations predict the dimensions of DNA’s structure. Not
only does the pentagonal geometry predict the helical dimensions but
it would also demonstrate ‘principle causation’.
• The pentagonal geometry provides the dynamics required to build a
consistent, stable and uniform helical structure and also establishes
why there should be consistently ten bases contained within a single
turn of the helix. Incidentally, when converted to the molecular
dimension I would certainly predict degrees of variation, certainly
between 9.5 and 10.5 bases per turn, but perhaps even more.
• Both the hollow centre and side-by-side structural formation ensure
instant access at any point within the helix. This would permit the
DNA (even circular) to open and close during its replication functions
without entangling itself.
• The modification to the base pairing would appear to be able to exist
in either the enol or keto formations.
• While the sugar-phosphate backbones will undoubtedly prove integral
to the stability of the helical structure, it is the geometry of the basepair
molecules themselves

© Mark E. Curtis

(Source: curtisdna.com, via logicianmagician)

astronomy-to-zoology:

Egyptian Sea Star (Gomophia egyptiaca)
…a species of Ophidiasterid sea star which despite its common name is widely distributed throughout the Indo-Pacific (including the Red Sea).  Like other sea stars Gomophia egyptiaca is omnivisrous feeding a range of sessile/slow moving organisms ranging from snails and sponges to algae. 
Classification
Animalia-Echindoermata-Asteroidea-Valvatidae-Ophidiastridae-Gomophia-G. egyptiaca
Image: Alexander Vasenin

astronomy-to-zoology:

Egyptian Sea Star (Gomophia egyptiaca)

…a species of Ophidiasterid sea star which despite its common name is widely distributed throughout the Indo-Pacific (including the Red Sea).  Like other sea stars Gomophia egyptiaca is omnivisrous feeding a range of sessile/slow moving organisms ranging from snails and sponges to algae. 

Classification

Animalia-Echindoermata-Asteroidea-Valvatidae-Ophidiastridae-Gomophia-G. egyptiaca

Image: Alexander Vasenin

thebeakerblog:

"Mathematically, even though we’ve made thousands of them, they’re impossible to make." - Erik Demaine describing the hyperbolic paraboloid on WNPR’s The Colin McEnroe Show. (Image Credit: Flickr Creative Commons, Stewart)

thebeakerblog:

"Mathematically, even though we’ve made thousands of them, they’re impossible to make." - Erik Demaine describing the hyperbolic paraboloid on WNPR’s The Colin McEnroe Show. (Image Credit: Flickr Creative Commons, Stewart)

(via npr)